Artikkelipyyntö

The Multiple Lives of Memories: Materializing Experiences of Soviet Terror

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Multiple Lives of Memories: Materializing Experiences of Soviet Terror 

Edited by Samira Saramo (Migration Institute of Finland) & Ulla Savolainen (University of Helsinki)

Keywords: memory; life stories; experiences; materiality; emotion; mobility; violence; repression; Soviet Union

This peer-reviewed international collection of articles focuses on the expansive reach of Soviet Terror through an analysis of the materialization of memories from multi-sited perspectives. The book examines the concrete mobility of life stories, letters, memoirs, objects, and bodies reflecting Soviet repression and violence across borders of geographical locations, historical periods, political regimes, and generations, while simultaneously paying attention to more abstract processes of textual circulation and (re)mediation. The collection asks: what happens to life stories, testimonies, and experiences when they travel in time and space and are (re)interpreted and (re)formulated through these transfers? What types of spaces for remembering, telling, and feeling are created, negotiated, and contested in these contexts? What are the boundaries and intersections of intimate, familial, and community memories?

The book explores these travels as processes of becoming, which reflect productive entanglements of the material, social, and discursive qualities in people’s experiences and memories with Soviet repression and violence. By engaging with current discussions on mediation (e.g. Erll & Rigney 2009; De Cesari & Rigney 2014), reception (e.g. Sindbæk Andersen & Törnquist-Plewa 2017; Etkind 2013), life writing and life storying (Gilmore 2001; Adler 2002; Merridale 2000; Šukys 2017), and materiality (Hirsch 2012; Miller 2011) in (cultural) memory studies and beyond, the collection of articles aims to open new perspectives on the multiple lives of memories, and who and what gets to remember and be remembered. Through this focus, this collection contributes fresh methodological perspectives to the study of Soviet Terror.

We invite article proposals (approx. 500 words) addressing the theme of the book to be sent to the editors () by May 15th, 2021. The proposals should describe the case study, research materials, and methodological framework of the planned article, along with a short biographical statement.Prospective contributors will be informed of decisions by June 1st, 2021. The deadline for the first version of article manuscripts is December 1st, 2021.

The book proposal will be sent with abstracts to an international academic publisher in September 2021 and the collection of articles will be sent for peer review in Spring 2022.

References

Adler, N. 2004. The Gulag Survivor: Beyond the Soviet System. London: Routledge.

De Cesari, C. and A. Rigney, eds. 2014. Transnational Memory: Circulation, Articulation, Scales. Berlin: De Gruyter.

Erll, A. and A. Rigney, eds. 2009. Mediation, Remediation, and the Dynamics of Cultural Memory. Berlin: De Gruyter.

Etkind, A. 2013. Warped Mourning: Stories of the Undead in the Land of the Unburied. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Gilmore, L. 2001. The Limits of Autobiography: Trauma and Testimony. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.

Hirsch, M. 2012. The Generation of Postmemory: Writing and Visual Culture After the Holocaust. New York: Columbia University Press.

Merridale, C. 2000. Night of Stone: Death and Memory in Russia. London, Granta.

Miller, N.K. 2012. What They Saved: Pieces of a Jewish Past.

Sindbæk Andersen, T. and B. Törnquist-Plewa, eds. 2017. The Twentieth Century in European Memory: Transcultural Mediation and Reception. Leiden: Brill.

Šukys, J. 2018. Siberian Exile: Blood, War, and a Granddaughter’s Reckoning. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.